Catalyst Billing and You

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The Office of the Bursar recently sent an email to all UC students about changes to the student billing process. Using Catalyst, the new student information system, the Bursar will now charge fees based on each student’s enrollment at different academic levels, or “careers,” during a term. Most graduate students will not be affected, but those enrolled in multiple programs or taking classes in the College of Law and College of Medicine may see changes in their bills. This FAQ addresses some graduate student situations and how they will be charged under the new system.

What is an academic career?

An academic career is the level of academic work a student takes to earn a specific academic objective (such as a degree or certificate). All UC programs and classes fall under one of four academic careers:

  • Medicine—Medical school and the MD degree. This career does not include master’s and PhD programs in the College of Medicine.
  • Law—Law school, legal certificate programs and the JD degree.
  • Graduate—All master’s degrees, doctoral degrees (not including the MD or JD), artist diplomas and graduate certificate programs. Students must have earned at least a bachelor’s degree to enter a graduate program.
  • Undergraduate—All bachelor’s degrees, associate’s degrees and undergraduate certificates. Undergraduate programs at UC branch campuses (Blue Ash and Clermont) are billed differently than those at the main campus.

I’m taking all of my graduate classes in a single department. Will my bill change?

No. Students in a single career and program will not see changes to their bill.

Questions?

For more information about billing, contact the One Stop Student Service Center at onestop@uc.edu or 513-556-1000.

For more information about Catalyst, contact the Catalyst Implementation Team using their online form.

For more information about graduate program options, contact the Graduate School Office at grad.info@uc.edu or 513-556-4335.

I’m taking classes from different departments, but all of my classes are graduate classes. Will my bill change?

No. Because Catalyst considers all graduate programs and classes to fall under a single “academic career,” all courses at the graduate level are billed at a single rate.

I’m enrolled part-time and taking classes from both a graduate program and another academic level. Will my bill change?

No. Part-time graduate students (i.e., those enrolled for nine credit hours or fewer) will continue to be billed for each credit at its per-hour rate.

I’m part of a 4+1 (bachelor’s and master’s) program. Under what circumstances will I be charged graduate tuition?

If you are formally enrolled in both the undergraduate and graduate programs, your full-time tuition will be determined by the career in which you are taking the most credits. If you take seven undergraduate credits and five graduate credits, for example, you will be billed as a full-time undergraduate student. Ties are broken in favor of the most expensive program, so if you take six undergraduate credits and six graduate credits, you will be billed as a full-time graduate student.

If you are not formally enrolled in the graduate program, you will be billed as a full-time undergraduate student. However, if you take seven or more graduate credits in a term, you will be billed a differential fee equal to the difference between the graduate and undergraduate full-time instructional fees. If you are not an Ohio resident, you will also receive a credit or charge for the difference in the non-resident surcharge between the two programs.

I’m a graduate student taking classes in the College of Law. Under what circumstances will I be charged law tuition?

If you are formally enrolled in a College of Law program (such as a dual-degree JD/master’s or certificate program), your full-time tuition will be determined by the career in which you are taking the most credits. If you take seven graduate credits and five law credits, for example, you will be billed as a full-time graduate student. Ties are broken in favor of the most expensive program, so if you take six graduate credits and six law credits, you will be billed as a full-time law student.

If you are not formally enrolled in a law program, you will be billed as a full-time graduate student. However, if you take seven or more law credits in a term, you will be billed a differential fee equal to the difference between the law and graduate full-time instructional fees. If you are not an Ohio resident, you will also receive a credit or charge for the difference in the non-resident surcharge between the two programs.

I’m a graduate student taking classes in the College of Medicine. Under what circumstances will I be charged medical tuition?

If you are formally enrolled in a dual-degree MD/PhD program (other College of Medicine programs are billed at graduate career tuition rates), your full-time tuition will be determined by the career in which you are taking the most credits. If you take seven graduate credits and five medicine credits, for example, you will be billed as a full-time graduate student. Ties are broken in favor of the most expensive program, so if you take six graduate credits and six medicine credits, you will be billed as a full-time medicine student.

If you are not formally enrolled in an medicine program, you will be billed as a full-time graduate student. However, if you take seven or more medicine credits in a term, you will be billed a differential fee equal to the difference between the medicine and graduate full-time instructional fees. If you are not an Ohio resident, you will also receive a credit or charge for the difference in the non-resident surcharge between the two programs.

I have other questions about how my bill will change. Whom should I contact?

You should contact the One Stop Student Services Center. Email onestop@uc.edu, call 513-556-1000 or visit 220 University Pavilion for more information.