174 Graduate Credit Rule

Students receiving any university award and who receive funds from the State of Ohio are governed by the requirements and limitations described in the following paragraphs. Any student who becomes ineligible to receive state subsidy is not eligible to receive general funds financial aid (i.e., a stipend and/or tuition).

Graduate students who have attempted 174 graduate credit hours at the University of Cincinnati are not eligible for a university award for enrollment at or beyond the 174 hours. Hours attempted include hours for which credit has been awarded, as well as hours in progress or incomplete. All graduate hours attempted at the University of Cincinnati, regardless of program or student status, count toward the 174 total. Attempted hours do not include hours from officially withdrawn courses.

If a student earned master’s credits at the University of Cincinnati (for either a partial or full degree), the exact number of these credits are deducted from the 174 credit hour total for which he/she can receive funding. This is true if the credits are earned at an earlier time and the student returns to the University of Cincinnati to continue graduate education, and it is true regardless of the discipline in which those credits were earned. For example, if a student has earned a master’s degree in engineering and then chooses to pursue a master’s and a doctoral degree in math, the credits earned to get the engineering degree are deducted from the 174 credit hours for which the student can receive state financial support (e.g., fellowships, assistantships, and scholarships).

Graduate students who have earned a master’s degree or other equivalent or higher advanced degree at another institution are not eligible for a university scholarship or fellowship once they have attempted 140 graduate credit hours at the University of Cincinnati. If a student enters the University of Cincinnati with a master’s degree from any institution other than the University of Cincinnati, he/she is credited with 34 graduate credit hours toward the 174 credit hour limit for state funding eligibility. Ohio can subsidize up to the remaining 140 credit hours. The 34 credit hours are deducted from the 174, regardless of the discipline and regardless of the graduate level at which the student enters the University of Cincinnati. For example, if a student has earned a master’s degree in engineering at The Ohio State University and then chooses to pursue a master’s and a doctoral degree in math at UC, the credits they earned to get their engineering degree are deducted from the 174 credit hours for which they can receive state financial support in the math program. Note that professional degrees, like a juris doctorate or medical doctorate do not count as a master’s or higher equivalent for the purpose of comparative funding. Students who enter graduate school at the University of Cincinnati with a professional degree and no other advanced degrees are still eligible to receive up to the 174 credit hours of funding.

If a student enters the University of Cincinnati with only partial credit toward a degree from another institution, those credits are not deducted from the 174 total—even if the program he/she is entering at the University of Cincinnati agrees to accept transfer of those credits toward the student’s degree requirements at the University of Cincinnati. The student can still receive state subsidy for up to 174 credit hours earned at the University of Cincinnati beyond those transferred in.

A student is not eligible for funding beginning with the semester in which said student will reach the 174 (or 140) attempted hours. For example, if a student has earned 167 graduate credit hours at the University of Cincinnati by the close of summer sessions and registers for (i.e., attempts) 12 credit hours for fall semester, he/she is ineligible for a university graduate scholarship or fellowship in the fall semester.

Any student ineligible to receive state funding is not eligible to receive university general funds financial aid, i.e., a stipend and/or tuition.

Note: For the purposes of this policy, a master’s degree is one awarded by an American institution or a degree of equivalent value from a foreign institution. Students holding a master’s degree from a foreign institution that is the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree in the U.S. will have the higher limit (174). The higher limit will not be affected by a student’s completion of course work short of a master’s degree at another institution.